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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
a leader is. and of course he got us to the moon, created the peace corps, the first real civil rights president. as my son, michael, points out, he's a real history buff, he took the segregationist party and made it a civil rights party. and he inspired people to go into public life. he said, public life is where it's at. it's not sport, it's public life. that's the one redolent reality of our lives. he's still there as the symbol of, look at bill clinton. all of these guys are inspired to go into public life because of him. >> do you see in the second generation after president kennedy, others that still may rise up and become big national leaders? >> i don't see it yet. i think the new joe kennedy in congress will do very well. he may be there for life if he wants to be. patrick has had problems with addiction and dealt with it. he's happily married with a child. good for him to get into private life. i've always thought maria shriver could have done something in public life besides be first lady of california. i thought she had a lot of talent and incredible charisma. i'm not sure
time in the most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the s
, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear,
of the civil rights movement, and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> that is caroline kennedy on a discussion of the 1952 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that is tuesday evening at 7:00 p.m. on c-span2. >> next, prime minister david cameron talks about the 3800 british troops that will be withdrawn from afghanistan by the end of 2013. he added that a small number of troops would remain to return equipment and work at an officer training academy. members also asked about the uk's immigration policy. also proposed health services spending cuts. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >>
the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions been made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy and a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. as we continue to the holiday on c-span2. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what are the most important issues to consider for 2013? >> make a short message for the president. >> joined the student can competition -- student cam competition. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> supreme court justice stephen breyer was recently at the brookings institution to talk about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when
, an did. this is for the marriage and sanctity of the family. gregg: did you read the iowa civil rights act? >> probably some time in 1991 when i was preparing for the new york bar. gregg: if you bothered to read the law you would have noticed that all you have to do is prove that gender is a factor, one factor, that's all. joey? >> arthur loves when i say this so i'm going to say it, this is outrageous. this is a blow to family values everywhere. when they couched the decision, that is the court in terms of family values. what about the values of this woman? what about equality, what about decency. what about respecting women and not treating them as objects. this decision goes too far. but consider the source, gregg, it was a decision mailed pwaoeupb seven males, which speaks to the need of having diversity on that court. when we look at the court's decision if it were not for our agenda mr. aidala she would have not been terminated. >> this was a woman running a law practice and one of her men was interfering with her marriage she could fire him as well. >> note hat gregg: the iowa c
on campus led to his initial ousting. >>> a rough end to the career of a maryland civil rights pioneer tp the director of civil rights for the maryland attorney general's office will retire january 8th. the ag's office made that announcement friday. the decision comes amid some legal problems for snowden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date next month for violating his probation in a drufrn driving case. >>> the man brutally beaten on christmas day believes he was the victim of a hate crime. according to a police report, 30-year-old kenny shaw had just left the liquor store at east hoffman and milton streets. he was only a block away when a group of five or six men surrounded him. additional blows followed. he also tells 11 news that he was taunted weeks ago and he thinks he was targeted this time. >> i feel like it was a hate crime because i am homosexual. like i said, i do stand out. >> police are now investigating this case and detectives say they have some good leads in what they are now calling an assault at this point. we're back in jus >> well,
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate
whitney. marva whitney, as we turn, died this weekend at the age of 68. we go back right now to mara verheyden-hilliard, executive director of the partnership for civil justice fund the released documents showing how the fbi monitored occupy wall street. i want to turn to one of the documents. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. part of a memo from the at the ipods field office from jacksonville, florida. the document is titled "domain program management domestic terrorism." is shows the fbi was concerned the occupy movement -- areascument cites certain of concern in central florida where -- you talk about this idea of the lone offender threat? >> i think that is very much botched checking by the fbi. there documents show they did not believe this was a movement that posed a threat of violence. throughout the documents, they're using their counter- terrorism resources and counter- terrorism authorities, defining the movement as domestic terrorism and potentially criminal in nature. the fact is, they also say throug
, qaddafi fell, everything was over. now looks like the syrian civil war could go on for years. right now, patti ann, about 45,000 people killed there sectarian violence continues and that number could easily double. back to you. patti ann: leland, thank you. gregg: a disturbing case of deja vu as a man is pushed to his death right in front of a new york city subway for the second time this month. an update on the hunt for his killer. patti ann: glow glowing tribute to a man remembered as one of the great military leaders of his generation. lawmakers and leaders stop to honor general norman schwarzkopf could have, the man who led desert storm, perhaps better known by his nickname storm minute norman ti. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewi
and this history of "jet" and you know, but we want to know what she likes to walk on the beach, right. >> listen -- >> is this a turning point to get back to the civil rigthts history? >> well, you know, i think that it is definitely a turning point. we are definitely trying to do more to balance the enterta entertainment, and the important news reporting. we have been doing that ever since i started about two yeas s ago, we have been working to find the delicate balance and making sure that we are informing with current news and things that are relevant to the community and providing the service. because that is what is so important about jet. they don't just inform, but they let others know how to use the information. that is another reason that jordan is on the cover, because like i said, we need to be active about this situation. we need to be active about jordan and be active about this l law, and be active about gun control and stay in motion. >> and mitzi, i want to come out of the table for a little bit, because farai, i want to ask you about "jet's" role and this moment, there is a lot
. and mostly after you passed your exams you would progress through the civil service. a very few got through the exams and said "i'm gonna drop out. "i don't want to be an administrator. "i want to go out into the landscape and right poetry. i want to paint paintings." and these were the literati, and this is the sort of thing that they did. and what's fascinating about this is we've got here, effectively, the table on which you did your scrolls. i've never noticed that. now, here we have a painting of-- i don't know whether he's-- he may be a grandfather, he may be a particular member of the literati. one can't be sure. the boys are bringing him refreshments. have you seen this? i've noticed that, yes. do you know what it is? it could be a bird or a bat or something. it's a bat! it is a bat? yeah. this boy's pointing at it because a bat in chinese is fu and fu is a homophone for "happiness." oh, right. and a red bat... ...is double happiness. oh, okay, yeah. isn't that wonderful? i mean, just a tiny little thing, and it just works. and it just gives the pi
, this crisis is long term. maybe we do need to get a little more aggressive especially when civil liberties have apparently been infringed upon. i also have the observation that government lawyers, i would say this. when you are the government you have an obligation to make things right. if you have done some the wrong he should make it right. it is not a good comparison but i remember when i was in the military, medical malpractice cases, if we were wrong we figure out how big the check was going to be, that is the right thing to do when you are the government. this is an important question and i urge you to take a look. >> judge brown elevated, make a difference? >> i think there would be a difference of opinion, correctly decided in the first interest and whether subsequent practical experience had led one to the conclusion, i fundamentally agree with what charlie was saying about i started at the justice department office of legal counsel after september 11th. i thought our was going to do establishment cause but national security, counterterrorism, international law, we sat down and lo
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)